2016 Community Grantees

College Spark Washington's 2016 grant recipients are listed below by region. 

 

Map of Washington

Northwest

Lake Washington Institute of Technology (Kirkland) -- $150,000 over three years to combine its intake and placement systems into one uniform system and to create systems of directed self-placement for English and math.  In directed self-placement, students are allowed to choose from a set of placement options after seeing examples of the concepts, course work, assessment, and student testimonials from different levels of pre-college and college-level math. 

Renton Technical College (Renton) -- $49,999 in one year to design an Open Doors dual credit reengagement program on its campus for students who left high school before graduating.  In collaboration with the Renton School District and community agencies, Renton Technical College will develop a curriculum that contextualizes English and math instruction into career and technical preparatory courses.   

Seattle Public Schools (Aki Kurose Middle School) (Seattle) -- $150,000 over two years to develop more intensive interventions to lower the rates of early warning indicators (EWI) for African-American males.  Students in the project will engage in goal setting cycles that will incorporate regular self-reflection with their own EWI and academic data, maintain a goal setting and action portfolio, meet with teachers acting as mentors, participate in facilitated family events, and have opportunities to meet with successful adults.  Student support protocols will be designed to allow all African-American males to matriculate into high school with a strong sense of student agency, with clear long term goals, and fully prepared for rigorous coursework.

Skagit Valley College (Mount Vernon) -- $149,712 over three years to design, sequence and implement introductory English classes to best promote student learning and success in a Guided Pathways system.  Aligning and sequencing English courses to areas of interest that students select has the potential to improve student motivation and learning. 

Whatcom Community College (Bellingham) -- $150,000 over three years to scale a co-requisite English course called English 101-Plus.  In co-requisite courses, students that would have been traditionally placed into a developmental, non-credit bearing course are instead placed directly into the college-level course and are provided additional supports during a longer class period.  This model provides the support for students to build skills, self-efficacy, and earn college credit within one academic quarter. 

Whatcom Community College (Bellingham) -- $150,000 over three years to redesign its math placement practices and developmental sequence to increase the rate of students earning college-level credit within two years.  Whatcom Community College will create a directed self-placement tool to help students select a math course for themselves after seeing examples of the concepts, course work, assessment, and student testimonials.  

 

Multiple Regions

Republic School District (North Central, South Central, Eastern) -- $150,000 over three years to develop, share, and sustain systems for long term improvements in discipline policy and practice.  Sound Discipline, a community-based organization, will provide support, consultation, and coaching to data teams from 10 rural districts focused on reducing discipline problems and improving outcomes for students.  The Rural Alliance for College Success will connect the work of participating districts so that implementation is supported by a network of rural educators. 

 

Eastern

Community Colleges of Spokane (Spokane) -- $149,991 over three years to partner with five districts within the Eastern Washington Rural Alliance Partnership (Mary Walker, Reardan-Edwall, Riverside, Grand Coulee Dam, and Colville) to improve college and career readiness for high school students by better preparing them to enter dual credit opportunities.  College faculty will work with high school teachers and counselors to design student learning modules that address academic gaps in math and English as well as other student success barriers including study skills, mindset, persistence, and time management. 

NEWESD 101 (Spokane) -- $149,998 over three years to use gamification as a strategy for addressing Early Warning Indicators (EWI) in two Eastern Washington middle schools – Centennial Middle School in the West Valley School District and Riverside Middle School in the Riverside School District.  Gamification is the use of game design elements - rules of play, competition, and scoring – in non-game contexts and has been studied for its potential to improve engagement, organizational productivity, learning, and systems.  NEWESD will train teachers and counselors in gamification of the classroom and about practices for review of EWI and identification of at-risk students.

Spokane Public Schools (Spokane) -- $150,000 over three years to make Advanced Placement Language and Composition the default English Language Arts course for all 11th grade students at Rogers High School. Project implementation will include professional development for 9th and 10th grade teachers in differentiation of instruction and instructional strategies that foster rigorous learning, training 11th grade ELA teachers to teach AP courses, and development of an ELA learning community focused on improving the rigor of ELA instruction.  

 

Northwest

Lake Washington Institute of Technology (Kirkland) -- $150,000 over three years to combine its intake and placement systems into one uniform system and to create systems of directed self-placement for English and math.  In directed self-placement, students are allowed to choose from a set of placement options after seeing examples of the concepts, course work, assessment, and student testimonials from different levels of pre-college and college-level math. 

Renton Technical College (Renton) -- $49,999 in one year to design an Open Doors dual credit reengagement program on its campus for students who left high school before graduating.  In collaboration with the Renton School District and community agencies, Renton Technical College will develop a curriculum that contextualizes English and math instruction into career and technical preparatory courses.   

Seattle Public Schools (Aki Kurose Middle School) (Seattle) -- $150,000 over two years to develop more intensive interventions to lower the rates of early warning indicators (EWI) for African-American males.  Students in the project will engage in goal setting cycles that will incorporate regular self-reflection with their own EWI and academic data, maintain a goal setting and action portfolio, meet with teachers acting as mentors, participate in facilitated family events, and have opportunities to meet with successful adults.  Student support protocols will be designed to allow all African-American males to matriculate into high school with a strong sense of student agency, with clear long term goals, and fully prepared for rigorous coursework.

Skagit Valley College (Mount Vernon) -- $149,712 over three years to design, sequence and implement introductory English classes to best promote student learning and success in a Guided Pathways system.  Aligning and sequencing English courses to areas of interest that students select has the potential to improve student motivation and learning. 

Whatcom Community College (Bellingham) -- $150,000 over three years to scale a co-requisite English course called English 101-Plus.  In co-requisite courses, students that would have been traditionally placed into a developmental, non-credit bearing course are instead placed directly into the college-level course and are provided additional supports during a longer class period.  This model provides the support for students to build skills, self-efficacy, and earn college credit within one academic quarter. 

Whatcom Community College (Bellingham) -- $150,000 over three years to redesign its math placement practices and developmental sequence to increase the rate of students earning college-level credit within two years.  Whatcom Community College will create a directed self-placement tool to help students select a math course for themselves after seeing examples of the concepts, course work, assessment, and student testimonials. 

Multiple Regions

Republic School District (North Central, South Central, Eastern) -- $150,000 over three years to develop, share, and sustain systems for long term improvements in discipline policy and practice.  Sound Discipline, a community-based organization, will provide support, consultation, and coaching to data teams from 10 rural districts focused on reducing discipline problems and improving outcomes for students.  The Rural Alliance for College Success will connect the work of participating districts so that implementation is supported by a network of rural educators. 

Eastern

Community Colleges of Spokane (Spokane) -- $149,991 over three years to partner with five districts within the Eastern Washington Rural Alliance Partnership (Mary Walker, Reardan-Edwall, Riverside, Grand Coulee Dam, and Colville) to improve college and career readiness for high school students by better preparing them to enter dual credit opportunities.  College faculty will work with high school teachers and counselors to design student learning modules that address academic gaps in math and English as well as other student success barriers including study skills, mindset, persistence, and time management. 

NEWESD 101 (Spokane) -- $149,998 over three years to use gamification as a strategy for addressing Early Warning Indicators (EWI) in two Eastern Washington middle schools – Centennial Middle School in the West Valley School District and Riverside Middle School in the Riverside School District.  Gamification is the use of game design elements - rules of play, competition, and scoring – in non-game contexts and has been studied for its potential to improve engagement, organizational productivity, learning, and systems.  NEWESD will train teachers and counselors in gamification of the classroom and about practices for review of EWI and identification of at-risk students. 

Spokane Public Schools (Spokane) -- $150,000 over three years to make Advanced Placement Language and Composition the default English Language Arts course for all 11th grade students at Rogers High School.  Project implementation will include professional development for 9th and 10th grade teachers in differentiation of instruction and instructional strategies that foster rigorous learning, training 11th grade ELA teachers to teach AP courses, and development of an ELA learning community focused on improving the rigor of ELA instruction.